Riley Toyota
Sales: 573-893-3100
Service: 573-644-9450
Parts: 573-893-5941
Close
Social Media Link
Social Media Link
Social Media Link
Social Media Link
Social Media Link
Close

2017 Toyota Camry vs. 2017 Honda Accord

2017 Toyota Camry

 

  • 33 mpg

  • 2.5 L engine

  • Remote keyless door locks

  • Rear-view camera

  • Steel wheels

2017 Honda Accord

 

  • 32 mpg

  • 2.4 L engine

  • Cruise control

  • AM/FM stereo

  • Alloy wheels
Introduction

Mid-size sedans like the Toyota Camry and the Honda Accord are perfect for young professionals who need dependable transportation for their commutes, or empty-nesters looking for a comfortable ride around town. Young and old alike appreciate the clean lines and luxurious style of the roomy four-doors. These are the cars that parents start out with when they’re young and pass down to their children when they pass their licensing exams, so it’s important for them to be safe, sturdy, and capable of handling whatever the road dishes out.

The Camry and the Accord both achieve these goals. Both the Toyota and the Honda are well-known brand names that are recognized for offering great service and reliability. Although they were initially manufactured overseas, both companies have a strong presence in the United States today.

Both cars offer a wealth of conveniences and this has always been a competitive class of cars, so it can be a difficult decision to choose between them. With so many great qualities in common, it’s no wonder that some find themselves in a quandary when making a purchase. A closer examination of the vehicles is necessary to make an informed choice.

Fuel Efficiency

Fuel efficiency is more important now than ever. Although the Camry and the Accord have similar numbers when it comes to miles per gallon, the Toyota performs a bit better. For those wishing to get the maximum use out of a tank of gas, the Camry is the best bet. It boasts an impressive 24 mpg in the city and 33 on the highway, while the Accord eats more gas, with 23 city, 32 highway.

Notably, the Camry manages this despite having a slightly bigger engine. Budget-minded and environmentally conscious consumers might prefer the Camry for this reason alone. After all, every mile counts, whether you are concerned about saving your pennies or the environment.  

Cockpit Controls

Both vehicles have a nice interior setup for the driver to enjoy, but the Toyota wins in this category as well, simply based on ease of use. While the Camry’s controls are intuitive and quick to decipher at a glance, the Honda’s setup is a little more frustrating. The touchscreen is a bit difficult to use, especially while maneuvering the car around town. The collision warning system is, if anything, overly cautious. The driver doesn’t need to be alerted to every little thing, and the beeping can become quite annoying. The cruise control is slow to respond and it almost seems that it might be easier to simply adjust your speed manually.

This is not to say that the Accord fails in its design, simply that it has a few flaws. Overall, both vehicles have luxurious options, but the Camry executes them more successfully.

Made in America

When it comes to American construction, the Toyota can’t be beaten. The Camry won Cars.com’s Most American Car in 2016, and will more than likely maintain the title for 2017. It is the first vehicle with 75% of its parts bought and built in the United States. Unfortunately, the Accord can’t make the same claim.

In these times of markets shifting overseas and uncertain employment, buying American is a big concern for a lot of people. Buying American also makes it easy to find parts and get repair work done, should any issues arise. Seeing a corporation take pride in manufacturing locally is a big selling point for lots of buyers.

Price

Price is the crucial category for many consumers, and once again, the Toyota Camry comes out ahead. At least, in the minds of many it does. Although the base price of $23,070 is slightly more expensive than the Honda Accord, which retails for $22,355, Toyota did not raise the price for the 2017 year model, and Honda did. The 2016 Accord is sold for $22,205.

 

Toyota maintained their price point in an unstable market, demonstrating their dedication to their customers and their willingness to work hard to offer an affordable product. When price hikes have become the norm and things seem to get more expensive year by year, if not month by month, consumers appreciate the stability and comfort of dealing with companies who are looking out for them.